Ultralight Backpacking Tent
Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo

$250 ($35 extra for seam sealing), 1 lb. 9 oz. (without the optional, 2-oz. carbon pole)

Sizes: men’s S-XL, women’s XS-XL

sixmoondesigns.com

At around 7,000 feet in Yellowstone in September, the season can turn on a dime—and the last 24 hours of an otherwise beautiful, five-day backpacking trip on Yellowstone’s Bechler River Trail demonstrated that, delivering steady rain and wind all night and on our last day of hiking (which featured a bone-chilling river ford). The trip’s range of weather put a spotlight on the strengths of the classic, ultralight Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo tent, as well as its one major weakness.

A single-wall, one-person, hexagonal tent with a floating floor, the Lunar Solo pitches using one trekking pole set to a 49-inch/124.5cm peak height and tilted slightly outward, requiring a pole that extends to at least 125cm. Six Moon Designs also sells a two-ounce carbon pole that can be used instead, but most backpackers buy a tent like this in order to drop the weight of a tent pole from their pack and a trekking pole is stronger than the optional carbon pole.


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The Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo ultralight backpacking tent in Bechler Canyon, Yellowstone National Park.
” data-image-caption=”The Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo ultralight backpacking tent in Bechler Canyon, Yellowstone National Park.
” data-medium-file=”https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Six-Moon-Designs-Lunar-Solo-door-open..jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Six-Moon-Designs-Lunar-Solo-door-open..jpg?fit=900%2C600&ssl=1″ width=”900″ height=”600″ src=”https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Six-Moon-Designs-Lunar-Solo-door-open..jpg?resize=900%2C600&ssl=1″ alt=”The Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo ultralight backpacking tent in Bechler Canyon, Yellowstone National Park.” class=”wp-image-47321″ srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Six-Moon-Designs-Lunar-Solo-door-open..jpg?resize=1024%2C683&ssl=1 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Six-Moon-Designs-Lunar-Solo-door-open..jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Six-Moon-Designs-Lunar-Solo-door-open..jpg?resize=768%2C512&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Six-Moon-Designs-Lunar-Solo-door-open..jpg?resize=150%2C100&ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Six-Moon-Designs-Lunar-Solo-door-open..jpg?w=1200&ssl=1 1200w” sizes=”(max-width: 900px) 100vw, 900px” data-recalc-dims=”1″ />The Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo ultralight backpacking tent in Bechler Canyon, Yellowstone National Park.

Pitching it properly requires placing the six stakes in a specific sequence: the front (door side) corners first, followed by the vestibule and the middle rear corner, then the two other rear corners and finally the front center. I spent about 30 minutes pitching it the first time in my back yard, figuring out the correct tension between the guyline that extends from the tent’s apex
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