>Mercedes have an unparalleled motorsport history. Throughout the years, the German manufacturer has been continuously innovating, testing, and retesting. From the invention of the first modern car, the use of four-wheel motors, to the dominance of the Silver Arrows in the 1930s, Mercedes has a long and rich history in motorsports.

This article looks back on the people and races that contributed to Mercedes Benz Motorsport history.

An unforgettable victory by Mercedes Benz to remember is the 1931 win at the Mille Miglia. Rudolf Caracciola and co-driver Wilhelm Sebastian drove the Mercedes-Benz SSKL to victory, beating the local favorites to become the first non-Italians to win.

Another memorable moment includes the 1971 class win and overall second place of Hans Heyer and Clemens Schickentanz at the 24 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps behind the wheel of the first Mercedes-Benz 300 SEL 6.8 AMG.

Two notable characters in Mercedes-Benz history: Juan Manuel Fangio and Rudolf Uhlenhaut. The incredible Argentinian racing driver Fangio was a contemporary of the brilliant development engineer Uhlenhaut. They encountered each other during the 1950s at Mercedes-Benz. Fangio was born 110 years ago, while Uhlenhaut was born 115 years ago. 

Juan Manuel Fangio- The Driver

The Formula One World Championship, founded in 1950, was dominated in its first decade by Juan Manuel Fangio. 

Juan Manuel Fangio won the 1954 Italian Grand Prix in a Mercedes-Benz Formula racing car W 196 R with a streamlined body. 

The Argentine racing driver became a five-time World Champion with four different manufacturers. In 1954 and 1955, he claimed the World Championship with the Mercedes-Benz W 196 R. 

On July 4, 1954, in his first foray in the race car, Fangio was able to claim victory at the French Grand Prix in Reims ahead of Karl Kling, his teammate.  

German President Theodor Heuss compliments winner Juan Manuel Fangio at the European Grand Prix at the Nürburgring, 1 August 1954

In 1954, he also managed to win the Swiss Grand Prix in Bern, European Grand Prix at the Nürburgring, and the Italian Grand Prix in Monza. The season ended with a World Championship win for Fangio. 

The 1955 season started with victory for the Argentinian as he claimed a triumphant win at the Argentine Grand Prix. Despite the excruciating heat, Fangio was the only driver to maintain racing without opting for a change of drivers. He also claimed the win at the Italian and Dutch Grands Prix, giving him his second World Championship win with Mercedes-Benz.  

Juan Manuel Fangio won the Dutch Grand Prix
Juan Manuel Fangio won the Dutch Grand Prix on 19 June 1955 in Zandvoort.

Following Mercedes-Benz’s withdrawal from motorsport, Fangio claimed victory in 1956 under Ferrari and in 1957 under Maserati.

Fangio retired in 1958 with 24 victories in 51 Grand Prix, a success rate of nearly 50%.

Winner of the 1955 Argentine Grand Prix,
Winner of the 1955 Argentine Grand Prix, Juan Manuel Fangio, in the Mercedes-Benz W 196 R racing car.

In 2019, to find out the greatest Formula One driver of all time, the magazine auto motor und sport used a comprehensive formula to compare all Formula One drivers with one another. After all the data were collected and computed, it revealed that Fangio ranked #1 ahead of Michael Schumacher and Lewis Hamilton.  

The race director of Mercedes-Benz in the 1930s and 1950s, Alfred Neubauer, described Fangio stating: 

“He understood how to achieve the maximum in all conditions and to use his machine economically. That is to say, he wasn’t a wild daredevil, but had the ability, tactics, and capacity to see the machine as a whole and to adapt this whole to the requirements of that very moment.” 

winner of Grand Prix

Journalist and Fangio’s biographer Günther Molter described the racer saying: 

“Fangio was always shy,

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By: Sports Car Digest
Title: Mercedes Benz Motorsport -Drivers, Developers, and Racing Victories
Sourced From: sportscardigest.com/mercedes-benz-motorsport/
Published Date: Fri, 28 May 2021 10:27:51 +0000

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