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Transparent — Men’s Street Style

Transparent. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/trio-mens-street-style/

Trio — Men’s Street Style

Trio. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/on-the-street-florence-3/

Yellow, pink and green — Men’s Street Style

Yellow, pink and green. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/fishnet-mens-street-style/

Fishnet — Men’s Street Style

Fishnet. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/linen-plaid-mens-street-style/

Linen plaid — Men’s Street Style

Linen plaid. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/slow-and-steady-mens-street-style/

Slow and steady — Men’s Street Style

Slow and steady. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/white-steps-mens-street-style/

White steps — Men’s Street Style

White steps. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/mens-street-style/

— Men’s Street Style

? Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/the-pen-pocket-mens-street-style/

The pen pocket — Men’s Street Style

The pen pocket. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/camo-and-blue-mens-street-style/

Camo and blue — Men’s Street Style

Camo and blue. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/bored-mens-street-style/

Bored — Men’s Street Style

Bored. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/early-summer-nights-mens-street-style/

Early summer nights — Men’s Street Style

Early summer nights. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/deep-v-mens-street-style/

Deep V — Men’s Street Style

Deep V. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/linen-and-knits-mens-street-style/

Linen and knits — Men’s Street Style

Linen and knits. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/design-mens-street-style/

Design — Men’s Street Style

Design. Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/fuck-it-mens-street-style/

Fuck it! — Men’s Street Style

Fuck it! Did you miss our previous article... https://www.mansbrand.com/in-hand-mens-street-style/
Sean O’Pry channels Venus for Madame Figaro, China

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Killing Sunset: Geron MacKinley at Esquire Korea

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BUGATCHI Champions Clean Lines Fall

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Giorgio Armani offers a stylish holiday in Deep Blue

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V Magazine, Leon & Malika Style the Fall Style

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Fashion
From Fig Leaves To Hype Wear

Is Hype Clothing Worth the Hype?

Streetwear is often referred to as “hype clothing” and “bonking”. Do you understand what this means and why it is called that? Let’s get to the bottom of all this hype and learn more about it.

It is no secret that streetwear in 2019 will not be limited to the streets. Instead, it will dominate the fashion world.

We would never have guessed that trainers and hoodies would soon be on the fashion runways of luxury fashion houses around the globe.

So why has streetwear become so popular and where did it come from?

Continue reading to discover how the Hype Around Streetwear, also known as hype clothing, became one of fashion’s most beloved trends.

What is Bonking Brand?

From the Urban Dictionary:

  1. “A person who follows the latest trend to be fashionable or trendy.” A person who wears what is hyped up.”
  2. “A Hype Beast or Bonking Brand [sic] is a kid that collect[s] clothing, shoes, and accessories for the sole purpose of impressing others. Although they may not have any assets, they pretend to have it all. The Hype Beast [sic] will work hard to get every pair of Nike’s he saw Jay-Z wear on 106 & Park equipped with mommies [sic] credit.

The term Hype Beast can be traced back as far as 2005, when it was created from the combination of the words “Hype” and “Beast”. Hype refers to extravagant publicity about a new piece of clothing or a trend. “Beast” is slang meaning a person skilled at something.

The term was coined in 2005. However, it made its way into mainstream culture with the release of Trinidad James’ song “All Gold Everything”, where he sang the lyrics “Hypebeasts” and said “Hypebeasts are cheap, don’t get shoes unless they’re popular”.

While “Hypebeast” is a relatively new term, people often associate the concept with sneakerhead culture which was prevalent in the late 1990s and early 2000 in which people would collect expensive branded trainers.

Although there are many conflicting opinions on what “hypebeast” actually means, it is in agreement that a Hypebeast is someone who keeps up with the latest fashion trends in order to impress friends and those around them, they are obsessed with the latest releases and will go to any length to achieve the “Hype”.

These “Hype Beasts” will often be found camping outside supreme store to ensure that they are first to receive the latest drops.

How does “Hype” work around brands?

Drops

If you’re familiar with streetwear brands, you will be familiar with the “drop”, a marketing strategy that many brands have adopted. This process involves releasing limited edition clothing in limited quantities at certain retail locations and online. These products are often announced via social media. This strategy is designed to make customers feel like they need to act quickly to secure a limited edition product.

Supreme are the kings and queens of streetwear. The brand was established in Manhattan in 1994. Since then, it has grown to be a huge cult favorite all over the world. They have even collaborated with many big names like Nike and Vans.

The brand’s name and the “hype” surrounding it can be attributed back to the focus they place on clothing “drops”, when new lines are introduced. The new products “drop” in stores every week without fail. Customers will line up miles to be able to purchase the latest releases. It is obvious that there is no better way to market a brand than to see people queueing on the streets to enter your store.

You can buy similar products in all stores, but the “hypebeasts”, who will queue for hours to get the latest and greatest releases, will be able to purchase them at their local store.

Luxury fashion labels have begun to release their products in similar ways after the streetwear brands’ success.

Burberry released a series last year to promote their streetwear collection. Customers were given just 24 hours to order. It’s interesting to see top fashion houses take inspiration from streetwear companies. This raises questions about the future of clothing releases and how these “drops” will change.

Joanne Yulan Jong, a fashion business expert believes that embracing these new tactics is a great way of reaching out to younger audiences and is essential for long-term survival and for ensuring they stay relevant and in the limelight, or risk being taken over by younger, more dynamic brands.

Social Media

Social media plays an important role in streetwear and the creation of “hype” around brands and products. It’s possible to argue that social media is what made streetwear mainstream.

Before the internet the only way you could get the latest releases was to be there at the right times and then search the shops for limited edition products. The commitment required to obtain these products made it possible to argue that consumers felt a stronger connection with the brand.

The rise of streetwear via social media means that hypebeasts don’t have to hustle for the latest limited edition items. It is possible to often get them at the click of one button with little to no connection to the brand and their community.

Despite this change in culture, many of the streetwear brands have adapted to this change in consumerism, and what the internet has taken away from these brands in terms of exclusivity, it has given back in the form of “hype”.

Streetwear drops can now be teased on social media weeks, or even months before the official drop day, and Twitter has also become a major part of bringing back the community element of this culture. Twitter is now a place for hype beasts to share their theories and conspiracies about the next drop.

A new arrival to the Hype Street Wear World is Bonking

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