By Michael Lanza

You want trekking poles for backpacking, dayhiking, running mountain trails, ski touring, or other backcountry activities, but the abundance of models and designs out there can seem overwhelming. Collapsible or folding, ultralight or heavier and sturdier, adjustable or not—which style is best for you? Save yourself a lot of time and the expense of making the wrong choice. This article will explain the key differences between models of trekking poles and how to choose the right poles for your needs.

My tips come from thousands of trail and off-trail miles using every type of pole out there on backpacking trips, dayhikes, mountain climbs and scrambles, ultra-trail runs and dayhikes, and backcountry skiing over more than a quarter-century of testing and reviewing gear, including 10 years as the lead gear reviewer for Backpacker magazine and even longer for this blog.

See my review of “The Best Trekking Poles” and my “10 Best Expert Tips for Hiking With Trekking Poles.”

Click on any photo below to read about that trip. Share your own tips or questions in the comments section at the bottom of this story. I try to respond to all comments.


Hi, I’m Michael Lanza, creator of The Big Outside. Click here to sign up for my FREE email newsletter. Join The Big Outside to get full access to all of my blog’s stories. Click here for my e-guides to classic backpacking trips. Click here to learn how I can help you plan your next trip.

A backpacker on the Redgap Pass Trail in Glacier National Park.
” data-image-caption=”Todd Arndt backpacking the Redgap Pass Trail in Glacier National Park. Click photo to see my e-guides to Glacier and other parks.
” data-medium-file=”https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Gla6-035-Todd-Arndt-on-Redgap-Pass-Trail-in-Glacier-National-Park-2.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Gla6-035-Todd-Arndt-on-Redgap-Pass-Trail-in-Glacier-National-Park-2.jpg?fit=900%2C600&ssl=1″ width=”900″ height=”600″ src=”https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Gla6-035-Todd-Arndt-on-Redgap-Pass-Trail-in-Glacier-National-Park-2.jpg?resize=900%2C600&ssl=1″ alt=”A backpacker on the Redgap Pass Trail in Glacier National Park.” class=”wp-image-44272″ srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Gla6-035-Todd-Arndt-on-Redgap-Pass-Trail-in-Glacier-National-Park-2.jpg?resize=1024%2C683&ssl=1 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Gla6-035-Todd-Arndt-on-Redgap-Pass-Trail-in-Glacier-National-Park-2.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Gla6-035-Todd-Arndt-on-Redgap-Pass-Trail-in-Glacier-National-Park-2.jpg?resize=768%2C512&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Gla6-035-Todd-Arndt-on-Redgap-Pass-Trail-in-Glacier-National-Park-2.jpg?w=1200&ssl=1 1200w” sizes=”(max-width: 900px) 100vw, 900px” data-recalc-dims=”1″ />Todd Arndt backpacking the Redgap Pass Trail in Glacier National Park. Click photo to see my e-guides to Glacier and other parks.

What to Look for in Trekking Poles

Look closely at trekking poles and you will see they are not nearly all the same. In fact, poles differ in many significant ways besides price and weight, including:

• Adjustable or fixed length (not adjustable)
• Adjustability range
• Collapsible or folding

Did you miss our previous article…
https://www.mansbrand.com/review-mystery-ranch-saddle-peak-ski-touring-pack/

Comments

0 comments