By Michael Lanza

Head into the mountains in summer, or almost anywhere in fall or spring, and you can encounter nighttime and morning temperatures anywhere from the 40s Fahrenheit to well below freezing. That’s more than cold enough to pose a real risk of hypothermia or, at the least, result in a miserable night for you or a partner or child you’ve taken backpacking or camping—and would like to take more. Here’s the good news: The very simple techniques outlined in this article can turn a potentially unpleasant night into a comfortable one.

Countless frosty nights sleeping outside over the past three-plus decade—including the 10 years I spent as a field editor for Backpacker magazine and even longer running this blog—have taught me a few things about how to stay warm. (My coldest night was -30° F, in winter in New Hampshire’s White Mountains. I don’t recommend it.)

No matter how easily you get cold when sleeping outside, or whether you’re camping in the backcountry or at a campground, these 10 tips will keep you warmer on cool and chilly nights in your sleeping bag.

Tell me what you think of my tips, ask any questions, or share your own tips in the comments section at the bottom of this story. I try to respond to all comments.


Hi, I’m Michael Lanza, creator of The Big Outside. Click here to sign up for my FREE email newsletter. Join The Big Outside to get full access to all of my blog’s stories. Click here for my e-guides to classic backpacking trips. Click here to learn how I can help you plan your next trip.

1. Clean Up

At the end of each hiking day, wash the dirt and dried sweat from your body; the latter can act like a heat conductor, chilling you, and getting a bit cleaner will just make you feel better. Swim in a lake, wade into creek and splash water all over yourself, or at least wet a bandanna or other cloth (or use wet wipes or other such products) and wipe yourself off.

Find your next adventure in your Inbox. Sign up for my FREE email newsletter now.

The Nemo Kyan 20 synthetic sleeping bag.
” data-image-caption=”The Nemo Kyan 20 synthetic sleeping bag. Click photo to read my review.
” data-medium-file=”https://i1.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Nemo-Kyan-20.jpg?fit=300%2C105&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i1.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Nemo-Kyan-20.jpg?fit=900%2C314&ssl=1″ width=”900″ height=”314″ src=”https://i1.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Nemo-Kyan-20.jpg?resize=900%2C314&ssl=1″ alt=”The Nemo Kyan 20 synthetic sleeping bag.” class=”wp-image-33097″ srcset=”https://i1.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Nemo-Kyan-20.jpg?w=1200&ssl=1 1200w, https://i1.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Nemo-Kyan-20.jpg?resize=300%2C105&ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Nemo-Kyan-20.jpg?resize=768%2C268&ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Nemo-Kyan-20.jpg?resize=1024%2C357&ssl=1 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/thebigoutside.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Nemo-Kyan-20.jpg?resize=1080%2C376&ssl=1 1080w” sizes=”(max-width: 900px) 100vw, 900px” data-recalc-dims=”1″ />The Nemo Kyan 20 synthetic sleeping bag. Click photo to read my review.

2. Change Into Dry Clothes

Damp clothes promote conductive heat loss from the body. Change into dry clothing to sleep, as opposed to the clothes you sweated in while
Did you miss our previous article…
https://www.mansbrand.com/dust-storms-on-mars-continue-to-make-the-planet-drier/

Comments

0 comments